Jordan at Glance

The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan is a constitutional monarchy with representative government.
The reigning monarch, His Majesty King Abdullah II, is the head of state, the chief executive and the commander-in-chief of the armed forces. The King exercises his executive authority through the prime minister and the Council of Ministers, or cabinet.

The cabinet is responsible before the elected House of Deputies which, along with the House of Notables (Senate), constitutes the legislative branch of the government.

Images of the ancient Nabatean city of Petra, carved from the rock over a thousand years ago, have long been most people’s first impression of Jordan. But while Petra is indeed one of the most stunning attractions in the Middle East, Jordan offers so much more for the modern traveller.

A well travelled bridge between sea and desert, east and west, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan is a land of mesmerizing beauty and contrasts, from the Jordan Valley, fertile, ever changing, to the remote desert canyons, immense and still.

Visitors can explore splendid desert castles, gaze in awe at the haunting wilderness of Wadi Rum, or bathe in the restful waters of the Red Sea.

For adventure lovers, there’s horse riding, 4x4 safaris, rock climbing and hiking. For taking it easy, nothing on earth compares to the Red Sea and its many spa facilities.

Modern Jordan was founded by King Abdullah I after World War I. It was ruled by his grandson, The Late King Hussein, for 46 years until his death in 1999, when his son King Abdullah II assumed the throne. Jordan has grown into a modern nation which has enjoyed a remarkable measure of peace, stability and economic growth in recent decades.

The judicial branch is an independent branch of the government. Since 1989, all elements of the Jordanian political spectrum have embarked together on a road to greater democracy, liberalization and consensus building. These reforms, which were guided by the late King Hussein, have placed Jordan on an irreversible road to democratization. The result has been greater empowerment and involvement of everyday citizens in Jordan's civic life, contributing to increased stability and institutionalization which will benefit the country far into the future.

For more information about Jordan, please visit these websites:
www.kingabdullah.jo
www.queenrania.jo
 




JORDAN'S CURRENT GOVERNMENT

The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan is a constitutional. The monarch is the head of state, the chief executive, and the commander-in-chief of the armed forces. The king exercises his executive authority through the Council of Ministers. The cabinet, meanwhile, is responsible before the elected House of Deputies, which, along with the Senate, constitutes the legislative branch of the government. The judicial branch is a totally independent branch.

Information courtesy of www.kinghussein.gov.jo

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GROUND TRANSPORT

Taxis

Taxis are inexpensive and often the most convenient form of transportation in Jordan, even over substantial distances, such as the trip between Amman and Aqaba. The white-painted "service taxis" ride fixed routes and are shared. Private taxis are painted yellow; they can be taken from ranks outside larger hotels, or hailed in the street. Taxis have metres, but these are not always used at night, so it is advisable to agree on the cost beforehand. The same applies to long journeys. Taxi drivers are friendly, know the city well, and usually speak English. It is considered appropriate for a woman to sit in the back of the taxi. Tipping isn't compulsory, but it is customary to add about 200 fils (20 piasters) to the price of the metre.
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BORDER CROSSINGS

Visitors with a valid passport may obtain a visa at any Jordanian embassy, consulate, or legation abroad. You can also obtain a visa upon arrival at Amman’s Queen Alia International Airport or at any other border crossing (except the King Hussein Bridge (Allenby Bridge) and the ferryboat from Egypt). Visa fees are 20 JDs ($30) for single entry valid for two weeks but easily extended at the nearest police station, or 60 JDs ($85) for multiple entries, valid for six months and non-extendable, to be paid in local currency. Few formalities need to be observed when departing Jordan: A departure tax of 8 JDs ($13) is paid at any border crossings except the airports.

Syria:
Coming to Jordan by road from Syria, you can cross into Jaber or Ramtha. Jaber is 80km away from Amman and is most commonly used by visitors, while Ramtha is 90km away and is mainly for cargo. Both borders are open 24/7 throughout the year.

Israel:
There are three border crossings between Jordan and Israel.
- The Allenby/King Hussein Bridge, 57km away from Amman, is located in the southern Jordan Valley.
- Sheikh Hussein crossing /North Border is 90km away from Amman. It is located in the north, close to Lake Tiberias (Sea of Galilee).
- Wadi Araba Crossing/South Border, located in the south, 324km away from Amman, connecting the two Red Sea resorts of Eilat and Aqaba.

Iraq:
Visitors can travel to Jordan by road from Iraq through Al-Karamah Border Crossing, which is 331km away from Amman and is open 24/7 throughout the year.
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AIRPORTS IN JORDAN

Air Transport
Besides Royal Jordanian, more than 20 international air carriers fly into Queen Alia International Airport, located 35km south of Amman. The flying time from the major European cities is about four hours. The easiest way to get to downtown Amman from Airport is by taxi; the Journey takes 30-45 minutes, and the fare is about 15 JDs (equivalent to around $22). However, shuttle buses to the city centre bus station are also available, leaving the Airport every half-hour.

Airports
-Queen Alia International Airport
Conveniently located within 50 minutes of Amman’s downtown, Queen Alia International Airport (QAIA) is considered to be the main airport in Jordan and is serviced by many global airline carriers.

-Amman Civil Airport
Also located in Amman, Amman Civil Airport mainly serves as a regional airport servicing domestic and nearby international routes. Home to airlines such as Royal Wings, Jordan Aviation, and Arab Wings, Amman Civil Airport is operational 24 hours a day.

-King Hussein International Airport
As Jordan’s gateway to the Red Sea region of Aqaba, King Hussein International Airport (KHIA) is approximately a 45-minute flight from either of Amman’s airports. Serviced by national and international carriers, KHIA is quickly growing to be a regional hub for both the holiday and business traveler alike.
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